10 Brain Exercises That Boost Memory

By Linda Melone

Learning new things is one of the best ways to improve brain health.

We don’t just lose muscle over time — our brains can atrophy, too. More specifically, your brain’s cognitive reserve — its ability to withstand neurological damage due to aging and other factors without showing visible signs of slowing or memory loss — diminishes through the years. That can make it more difficult to perform mental tasks. But just as weight workouts add lean muscle to your body and help you retain more muscle in your later years, researchers now believe that following a brain-healthy lifestyle and performing regular, targeted brain exercises can also increase your brain’s cognitive reserve.

The Healthy Brain: A Multifaceted Approach

In one of the most detailed studies on the connection between lifestyle and dementia risk to date, researchers found that people who participate in multiple healthy behaviors significantly reduce their risk for dementia. The 2013 study, published in PLOS ONE, looked at 2,235 men for 30 years and measured their participation in five healthy lifestyle behaviors: non-smoking, optimal BMI, high fruit and vegetable intake, regular physical activity, and low to moderate alcohol intake. The study participants who followed four or all five of the behaviors were about 60 percent less likely to develop cognitive impairment and dementia.

Related: 11 Early Signs of Dementia

“Approaches to brain health include a well-balanced diet low in fat, low in cholesterol, and high in antioxidants,” says Robert Bender, MD, medical director of the Johnny Orr Memory Center and Healthy Aging Institute in Des Moines, Iowa.

In addition to good nutrition, regular exercise can promote vascular health to help protect brain tissue. Avoiding ruts and boredom is also critical. “The brain wants to learn new things,” says Dr. Bender, noting that some researchers believe that people are more vulnerable to dementia when they pay less attention to the things around them. “When the brain is passive, it has a tendency to atrophy,” he adds. For this reason, sedentary and relatively passive activities, such as sitting in front of a TV for hours a day, can be detrimental to brain health over time.

10 Real-World Brain Exercises That Work

On top of a healthy diet and regular exercise, there are ways to give your brain its own workout routine — without emptying your wallet. Although brain training software is everywhere these days, it has yet to show any significant neurological benefits for older adults. In a 2014 review published in PLOS Medicine, Australian researchers looked at 52 different studies on computerized cognitive training on a total 4,885 participants and found that the games are not particularly effective in improving brain performance.

Experts recommend sticking to brain training that involves real-world activities. Exercises to strengthen brain function should offer novelty and challenge. “Almost any silly suggestion can work,” says David Eagleman, PhD, neuroscientist and assistant professor at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. “Drive home via a different route; brush your teeth with your opposite hand. The brain works through associations [which is why it’s easier to memorize lyrics to a song than it is to try and remember the same words without music], so the more senses you involve the better.”

Your morning newspaper is a great place to start. “Simple games like Sudoku and word games are good, as well as comic strips where you find things that are different from one picture to the next,” says John E. Morley, MD, director of St. Louis University’s Division of Geriatric Medicine and author of The Science of Staying Young. In addition to word games, Dr. Morley recommends the following exercises to sharpen your mental skills:

1. Test your recall. Make a list — of grocery items, things to do, or anything else that comes to mind — and memorize it. An hour or so later, see how many items you can recall. Make items on the list as challenging as possible for the greatest mental stimulation.1. Test your recall. Make a list — of grocery items, things to do, or anything else that comes to mind — and memorize it. An hour or so later, see how many items you can recall. Make items on the list as challenging as possible for the greatest mental stimulation.

2. Let the music play. Learn to play a musical instrument or join a choir. Studies show that learning something new and complex over a longer period of time is ideal for the aging mind.2. Let the music play. Learn to play a musical instrument or join a choir. Studies show that learning something new and complex over a longer period of time is ideal for the aging mind.

3. Do math in your head. Figure out problems without the aid of pencil, paper, or computer; you can make this more difficult — and athletic — by walking at the same time.3. Do math in your head. Figure out problems without the aid of pencil, paper, or computer; you can make this more difficult — and athletic — by walking at the same time.

4. Take a cooking class. Learn how to cook a new cuisine. Cooking uses a number of senses: smell, touch, sight, and taste, which all involve different parts of the brain.4. Take a cooking class. Learn how to cook a new cuisine. Cooking uses a number of senses: smell, touch, sight, and taste, which all involve different parts of the brain.

5. Learn a foreign language. The listening and hearing involved stimulates the brain. What’s more, a rich vocabulary has been linked to a reduced risk for cognitive decline.5. Learn a foreign language. The listening and hearing involved stimulates the brain. What’s more, a rich vocabulary has been linked to a reduced risk for cognitive decline.

6. Create word pictures. Visualize the spelling of a word in your head, then try and think of any other words that begin (or end) with the same two letters.6. Create word pictures. Visualize the spelling of a word in your head, then try and think of any other words that begin (or end) with the same two letters.

7. Draw a map from memory. After returning home from visiting a new place, try to draw a map of the area; repeat this exercise each time you visit a new location.7. Draw a map from memory. After returning home from visiting a new place, try to draw a map of the area; repeat this exercise each time you visit a new location.

8. Challenge your taste buds. When eating, try to identify individual ingredients in your meal, including subtle herbs and spices.8. Challenge your taste buds. When eating, try to identify individual ingredients in your meal, including subtle herbs and spices.

9. Refine your hand-eye abilities. Take up a new hobby that involves fine-motor skills, such as knitting, drawing, painting, assembling a puzzle, etc.9. Refine your hand-eye abilities. Take up a new hobby that involves fine-motor skills, such as knitting, drawing, painting, assembling a puzzle, etc.

10. Learn a new sport. Start doing an athletic exercise that utilizes both mind and body, such as yoga, golf, or tennis.10. Learn a new sport. Start doing an athletic exercise that utilizes both mind and body, such as yoga, golf, or tennis.

Soon people will realize that they can take steps to keep their brains healthy, just as they know they can prevent heart disease by taking certain actions, says Bender. “In the coming decade, I predict brain wellness to be right up there with heart health — now that there’s proof that living a brain-healthy lifestyle works!”

Sarah McNaughton also contributed to this report.

Last Updated:4/16/2015

” BE A WINNER “

From http://www.everydayhealth.com/longevity/mental-fitness/brain-exercises-for-memory.aspx

 

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How to Exercise Your Brain

Whether you’re trying to get your brain back into shape or you just want to keep it as strong as it is now, it’s not only easy to train your brain but it’s now considered a part of what makes aging a lot more graceful and less forgetful. Get that gray matter up off your skull-couch and get to work with wikiHow!

PART 1. Enhancing your thinking and word skills

1.Read as much as you can. Reading is great basic brain exercise. You can read newspapers, magazines or books but just keep in mind that the more challenging the text is, the more of a workout your brain will get. Like any exercise, start small and work your way up.

2.Increase your vocabulary. Learn new words from a word-a-day calendar or dictionary. This exercises the language portion of your brain.

3. Write something. Writing requires loads of thinking! You can write made-up stories, write down the things that have happened to you or write articles for wikiHow on the topics you know and love!

4. Learn a new language. Learning a language is like a hack for your brain, opening up all sorts of pathways. This exercises the part of your brain that stores language information, even making you better at speaking your own language.

5. Post-problem solve. Consider the different possibilities of how something in your day could have gone, and explore the consequences. This improves creativity and makes you a better problem solver.

6. Turn off the television. Television tells you what to think and how to think it, basically putting your brain on autopilot. That’s why it’s so relaxing! If you want to keep your brain from stagnating, the first thing you have to do is turn off the TV. If you really want to watch, use your brain while you watch. Choose to watch educational programs and if you watch popular programs, choose ones with complex plot lines or character interactions. Think about these while you watch and try to analyze them or guess what happens next.

PART 2. Playing games for better brains

1. Do daily crosswords and puzzles. Simple puzzles like crosswords can help your brain do some basic work. These are easy to fit into your day. You can even find some for free online.

2. Progress to more involved puzzles. Large, complex puzzles give your brain a stronger workout. These can sometimes take several days to a week to finish but they’re worth the effort. This doesn’t just mean a puzzle in the traditional sense, either. Check out Japanese pocket puzzles for a serious brain teaser that you can do while you’re killing time.

3. Consider playing chess. Chess is an incredibly strategic as well as a tactical game. Few puzzles surpass chess in working out your brain. Chess is simple to learn and easy to play.

4. Play video games. Did you know that video games actually make you smarter? Puzzle solving games like Mario, Zelda, Scribblenauts, and Myst are like a good cardio workout for your brain, helping you to become a better problem solver, a more creative problem solver, and a faster thinker.

PART 3. Challenging yourself

1. Switch your dominant hand. Use your left hand if you are right handed, and reverse, to stimulate the parts of your brain that control your muscles.

2. Play a musical instrument or fiddle with a Rubik’s cube. Over 100,000 years, the human brain has evolved to tune itself through both making and using tools. By doing things that are similar to using tools, you help to fine tune your brain and keep it humming along nicely. For example, playing the violin or doing the Rubik’s cube have things in common with making and using tools. All require the use of gross motor skills, fine motor skills and sequences to operation and identification of things. Therefore, doing such activities daily or twice a day, should help to keep your brain in great shape.

PART 4. Socializing more

1. Talk with people. Talk with people about things you or they know about. Talking about politics, religion, and other challenging topics (having real discussions, not just arguments), can be a great basic brain workout.

2. Join an interest group. Join a group or club for people with the same interests as you. This can be a hobby club, a political group, a discussion group, or anything like that. Talking with people with similar interests will get you using your brain and your skills.

PART 5. Making learning lifelong

1. Go back to school. Going back to school is a great way to get that brain working again and more education has obvious benefits. You don’t even need to get a whole degree. Your employer may be willing to help you finance classes that further your job skills, or you can just take a single class in a subject that interests you.

2. Take free classes. If you just don’t have the money or time, there are also a number of free classes available online. Some are even from top universities, like Harvard. Try Coursera, Khan Academy, or even just Ted Talks to get the university experience, without the price.

3. Use skills you have already gained frequently. With your brain, much like your muscles, it’s kind of a “use it or lose it” situation. The longer you go without using information and skills, the rustier they get. Frequently use basic skills, like doing math, in order to keep those skills fresh and ready to use.

4. Pick up a new hobby. Learning a new skill is also a great way to give your brain a workout. Creative skills especially, like music, dance, and visual art, will exercise different parts of your brain and all have incredible benefits.

5. Build things. Whether you’re building robots or a new bench for your hallway, using your brain to figure out how to make something (especially from scratch with no instructions) is a great workout. Get some basic building skills and then get your brain limber with some practical creativity.

PART 6. Keeping healthy

1.Eat well and exercise. Diet and exercise actually play a role in the health of your brain as well. If you want to keep your brain in peak condition, eat a healthy diet rich in protein and omega 3 fatty acids to keep your brain physically fed. Drink water as much as you can. Physical exercise can also keep your body healthy, reducing the chance of stroke and increasing oxygen saturation levels.

2. Play sports. Learn exercises or how to play new games to increase your hand-eye and body coordination. Tai-chi and pinball are both examples of this.

3. Sleep well. Scientists are actually discovering that sleep plays an absolutely vital role in keeping your brain healthy. While you sleep, your body cleans toxins out of your brain (in addition to making repairs). [2] If you want to protect your brain, make sure you get a full night’s sleep as regularly as possible.

4. Change up your routine. Try commuting with varied routes, to prevent the brain from feeling too neglected as the result of a monotonous day. You can also change how you work, by introducing an exercise ball or other factor into how you work.

Tips

⦁ When exercising, try to walk-backward (the reverse direction of the usual walking pattern) to tease the sphere of the brain.

⦁ Remember to exercise your body – a healthier mind results from a healthy body. Get plenty of physical exercise.

⦁ Try doing a few things regularly, like memorizing something each day, or using a Rubik’s cube for 15 minutes a day.

⦁ There are plenty of programs out there that will help with your memory. “Brain Age” or “Big Brain Academy” for the Nintendo DS are recommended and fun. These games were specifically made for improving your memory, as well as promoting fast reflexes and quick thinking.

⦁ Like every other part of your body, the brain also requires rest. It never really shuts down, but focusing on a single point or meditation can actually help you relax your mind which can result in the slowing of your brain and later on better functionality. Listening to soft instrumental music with closed eyes for 10-15 mins a day usually helps.

⦁ The way you speak reflects the way you think, so think before you speak. This will help improve your speech.

⦁ Drink plenty of water.

⦁ While doing anything, try not to follow the usual rules for it. Try it yourself and see if you can make your own rules.

” victory belongs to most persevering “

from wikihow

 

How to Be Yourself

“Be yourself” is quite possibly the most commonly used phrase in the history of individualist-based advice. Be yourself. It’s such a vague adage. What does it really mean, to be yourself? And is it really as easy as it sounds? With the steps below, it can be.

PART 1. Discovering Who You Are

1. Find yourself and define yourself on your terms. Oscar Wilde once said with his usual wit: Be yourself; everyone else is already taken. As humorous as this might seem, it’s a basic summation of the truth. Yet, you can’t be yourself if you don’t know, understand, and accept yourself first. It should be your primary goal to find this out.

⦁ Find the time to learn upon what you value and take time to consider what makes up the essence of who you are. As part of this, contemplate your life and choices. Try to think about what kinds of things you would or wouldn’t like to do, and act accordingly; finding out through trial and error helps more than you might think it does.

⦁ You can even take personality tests, but be careful to only take what you want from them so that you do not let such tests define you. Instead, ensure that the defining you do is based on your own terms and is something you feel absolutely comfortable with. You may feel self-conscious, but over time if you are around the right type of people for you, they will accept you for who you are.

2. In finding your values, don’t be surprised if some of them seem to conflict. This is a natural result of taking on broad values from a variety of sources, including culture, religion, mentors, inspiring people, educational sources, etc. What does matter is that you continue working through these conflicts to resolve what values feel most true to yourself.

⦁ Just because your values seem to conflict doesn’t mean you necessarily have to abandon them. Consider it all a part of a dynamic you. You cannot be shoved into any box or pegged. You have values for all different aspects of your life, so it’s natural they be different.

3. Avoid fixating on the past and not letting yourself grow. One of the most unhealthy approaches to being oneself is to make a decision that who you are is defined by a moment or period of time, after which you spend the rest of your life trying to still be that person from the past rather than someone who is still you but grows with the passing of each season and decade. Allow yourself this space to grow, to improve, to become wiser.

⦁ Allow yourself to forgive past errors and past behaviors you’re not so proud of. Work on accepting mistakes and choices you’ve made; they’re done and in the past. You had your reasons for them and the decision made sense at the time, so instead of harnessing yourself to past mistakes, allow yourself to learn their lessons and continue to grow.

⦁ Look for people around you who proudly proclaim they are no different than they were the day they turned 16 or 26 or 36, or whatever. Do these people seem flexible, easygoing, happy people? Often they are not because they are so busy insisting that nothing has changed for them ever, that they’re incapable of taking on new ideas, learning from others, or growing. Growth into every new age and stage of our lives is an essential part of being true to ourselves and to being emotionally healthy and whole.

4. Never stop looking for your own strengths. Over time, these may change and thus, so may your definition of yourself, but never let up in focusing and refocusing on them. They more than adequately balance out your flaws and are the principal reason for not comparing yourself to others.

⦁ Comparison leads to resentment. A person filled with resentment cannot focus on the mantra of “be yourself” because they are too busy hankering after someone else!

⦁ Comparison leads also to criticism of others. A life filled with criticizing others stems from low self-esteem and a need to pull others off their perches that you’ve placed them on. That’s both a way to lose friends and respect, and it’s also a way of never being yourself because you’re envy-struck and spending too much time on admiring others for their characteristics and not on yourself.

5. Relax. Stop worrying about the worst that could happen, especially in social situations. So what if you fall flat on your face? Or get spinach stuck in your teeth? Or accidentally head butt your date when leaning in for a kiss? Learn to laugh at yourself both when it happens and afterward.

⦁ Turn it into a funny story that you can share with others. It lets them know that you’re not perfect and makes you feel more at ease, too. It’s also an attractive quality for someone to be able to laugh at themselves and not take themselves too seriously!

PART 2. Dealing with Others

1. Be honest and open. What have you got to hide? We’re all imperfect, growing, learning human beings. If you feel ashamed or insecure about any aspect of yourself and you feel that you have to hide those parts of you, whether physically or emotionally then you have to come to terms with that and learn to convert your so-called flaws into individualistic quirks or simply as basic, down-to-earth acknowledgments of your own imperfections.

⦁ Try the tactic of owning up to your imperfections mid-argument with someone. You will often discover that suddenly you’ve removed the very reason for stubbornly holding the line of argument, which is often about preserving face and not giving in. The moment you say, “Yeah, look, I get really irritable when the room’s in a mess too. And I acknowledge that I shouldn’t leave my clothes in a pile on the floor and yet I do it because that’s a lazy part of myself I’m still trying to train out of the habit. I’m sorry. I know I could do better, and I will try,” you suddenly infuse an argument with genuine self-honesty that disarms the entire point of the argument.

2. Don’t compare yourself to others. If you’re always striving to be someone you’re not already, you’ll never be a happy person. This comes about through comparing yourself to others and finding yourself wanting in certain ways. This is a slippery slope to tread, where your thinking will only become more and more negative.

⦁ You can always see the appearances others wish to portray publicly but you won’t ever see what’s really going on behind their facades in their apparently perfect world. By comparing yourself to others, you give their image-portrayal way too much power and reduce your own worth based on a mirage. It’s a useless activity that only brings harm.

⦁ Instead, value the person you are, love your personality, and embrace your flaws; we all have them, and as explained earlier, being honest is better than running from them.

3. Stop caring about how people perceive you. Some of them will like you and some of them won’t. Either attitude is as likely to be right or wrong. It’s next-to-impossible to be yourself when you’re caught up in constantly wondering “Do they think I’m funny? Does she think I’m fat? Do they think I’m dumb? Am I good/clever/popular enough to be a part of their group of friends?” To be yourself, you’ve got to let go of these concerns and just let your behavior flow, with only your consideration of others as a filter — not their consideration of you.

⦁ If you change yourself for one person or group, another person or group may not like you, and you could go on forever in a vicious cycle trying to please people instead of focusing on building up your talents and strengths.

4. Stop being a people-pleaser. Always wanting everyone’s love and respect is a totally pointless exercise in the end that can harm your personal development and confidence. Who cares what other people say? As Eleanor Roosevelt said once, no one can make you feel inferior without your consent and what matters most is that you listen to your own inner confidence and if it’s missing, that you start developing it!

⦁ Does this mean no one’s opinion in life matters? No. It hurts if you’re socially rejected. If you’re forced into a situation where you must spend most or all of your time among people who can’t stand you for reasons of their own, it’s dangerous to internalize their negative ideas of who you are. What you can do is exercise some choice in whose opinions you value more than others. It’s much healthier to pay attention to people who genuinely mean you well and who agree with you about what you want to do with your life.

5. Surround yourself with positive people. Don’t trivialize what you’re going through if you face negative social pressure or bullying. It’s easier to withstand it if you are aware of it as pressure and build healthy defenses. Building up a circle of trusted friends and people who share your views and beliefs in life is a good way to help reduce the impact of hostile people. You can tell yourself their opinions don’t matter, and they shouldn’t, but that’s a lot easier when there are others who agree with you and stand by you.

⦁ Compare those who love you to whoever the bully is; suddenly you can realize that their opinion of you, your family or your lifestyle, is worthless. We inherently care about the opinions of those we respect and look up to. This works both ways; if someone has no respect for you, then what they say about you is just empty words coming from someone who is one step above being a total stranger.

6. Learn the difference between intimidating, sarcastic, or conniving comments and well-intended constructive criticism. It will focus on real faults that you don’t know about, and could do with remedying. In the latter case, people such as parents, mentors, teachers, coaches, etc., might well be telling you things that you need to digest and mull over at your own pace, to make self-improvements for the better. The difference is that their critique of you is intended to be helpful.

⦁ These people care about you and are interested in how you grow as a person, and are respectful. Learn how to spot the difference and you will live well, dismissing pointless negative critiques, and learning from the constructive critique.

PART 3. Cultivating Your True Self

1.Treat yourself as you’d treat your own best friend. You value your friends and those close to you; well, who is closer to you than you are? Give yourself the same kind, thoughtful, and respectful treatment that you give to other people you care about. If you had to hang out with yourself for a day, what is the most fun/enjoyable/fulfilled/calm/contented type of person you could be, while still being yourself? What is the best version of you?

⦁ Be responsible for yourself and for boosting your self-esteem. If others aren’t telling you you’re great, don’t let it get to you. Instead, tell yourself you’re special, wonderful, and worthwhile. When you believe these things about yourself, others will recognize that glow of self-confidence and begin confirming your self-affirmations in no time!

2. Develop and express your individuality. Whether it’s your sense of style, or even your manner of speaking, if your preferred way of doing something strays from the mainstream and produces positive outcomes, then be proud of it. Be a character, not a type.

⦁ Learn to communicate well – the better you can express yourself, the easier it is for the people who like you as you are to find you and the ones who don’t to just steer clear.

3. Avoid being unfair to yourself. Sometimes comparison causes us to compare apples with pears. We’d like to be a top movie producer in Hollywood when we’re a lowly, aspiring scriptwriter. To see that top producer’s lifestyle and find yourself wanting as a result is an unfair comparison – that person has years of experience and hobnobbing behind them, while you’re just starting out, testing the waters with writing skills that may one day prove to be exceptional.

⦁ Be realistic in your comparisons and only look to other people as inspiration and as sources of motivation, not as a means to belittling yourself.

4. Follow your own style. The common thing a lot of people do is copy others’ actions because it seems like the better route to fit in, but really, shouldn’t you stand out? Standing out is very hard, yes, but you need to try avoid assuming other people’s perspectives of you, even if it’s not something you would normally do; that’s what being yourself is all about.

⦁ Whatever you are, accept it. Being different is absolutely beautiful and it attracts people to you. Don’t let people change you!

5. Accept that some days will be better than others. People might raise eyebrows and even make fun of you when you feel like you’re truly being you, but as long as you can shrug and say, “Hey, that’s just me,” and leave it at that, people will ultimately respect you for it, and you’ll respect yourself. Most people struggle being themselves; if you can do it, they might even admire you.

⦁ Sometimes it will hurt when you’re teased. While this can be very difficult, and far easier said than done, try your best to flick it off your shoulder. In the end, you’ll be a bigger and better person, know who you are, and better able to survive whatever obstacles arise in your future.

PART 4. Standing Tall

1. Stand up for yourself. When someone bullies you, why let them? They never got a certificate saying they had the right to bully! If you have a problem, there are so many good, understanding people eager to help you.

2. Stand up for others. When you catch a bully, it is in your good nature to stop them. No matter how you do it, you have the right to stop it. You believe in yourself.

3. Stand up for those you stood up to. Just because you had to defend yourself doesn’t mean these people have no heart!

Tips

⦁ Just because someone says they don’t like something about you doesn’t mean it’s bad or you need to change it. It really depends on what it is; often it’s a matter of preference.

⦁ Change is a constant. So changing who you are over time is inevitable, and is always likely to be a good thing if you’ve stayed informed, relevant, and clued in to the world around you and have allowed your personal development to be a top priority in your life.

⦁ Even if your friends seem different, don’t hold back. Be yourself and if they don’t accept you they aren’t your real friends.

⦁ It can be highly harmful when you’re striving to “be like” someone else just to have their popularity, appearance, and attitudes rub off on you. Keep unique by keeping your perspective focused on building your strengths through the inspiration of others, not through becoming like them.

⦁ Fads and trends are a personal decision. While some people avoid them like the plague in the name of “individualism”, it doesn’t mean you’re not being yourself when you choose to follow a trend. It’s all about what you want.

⦁ Know when going with the flow is better than digging your heels in on something. Example: Sometimes it’s better to agree on going to a concert of a band you don’t like because you’ll be spending time and having fun with your friends. That’s about compromising and being respectful of others’ preferences.

⦁ Don’t say you can do something when you can’t just to please someone! This won’t help at all, and that person will just find out easily.

⦁ While trying and accepting yourself, don’t let your flaws get you down. If you can work on it and even if not, know that they make you who you are and help you define yourself. Flaws are actually a part of you, don’t be ashamed of them.

⦁ While picking out an outfit, look at yourself in your mirror. Instead of picking the bad things about how you look, pick out the good ones. This helps boost your confidence.

⦁ Don’t let your friends get you down or mislead you into something you don’t want to do. Be you & Be True to who you are.

Warnings

⦁ Not caring about how others perceive you doesn’t mean letting go of grooming and manners. Basic respect for yourself and others is founded in etiquette and ensures that people can all live together in harmony and with a basic level of expectation for how they will interact with one another politely.

⦁ Respect others as much as you respect yourself. While being yourself means expressing yourself and your opinions, dreams, and preferences, it certainly doesn’t mean ramming these down other people’s throats! Everyone has needs, dreams, and wants that are equally deserving and it’s up to each one of us to acknowledge the other’s value as much as our own. Therefore, avoid being rude, thoughtless, or egotistical in your journey to being yourself.

” BE YOURSELF “

FROM WIKIPEDIA

Strategy of tension

The strategy of tension (Italian: strategia della tensione) is a theory that Western governments during the Cold War used tactics that aimed to divide, manipulate, and control public opinion using fear, propaganda, disinformation, psychological warfare, agents provocateurs, and false flag terrorist actions in order to achieve their strategic aims.

The theory began with the Cold War Soviet hoax document called US Army Field Manual 30-31B, where the term was first published. It was made more broadly dispersed by an Italian parliamentary committee, and later popularized by Swiss academic Daniele Ganser.

The so-called strategy of tension may also have its roots in Carl von Clausewitz’s treatise On War, which heavily influenced Cold War thinking and modern military strategy. Book 3, Chapter 18 of On War pertinently describes the psychological and sociological effects of fear and their relationship to the furtherance of military objectives, “If a state of tension exists, the effects of the decision are always greater, partly because a greater force of will and a greater pressure of circumstances manifest themselves therein; partly because everything has been prepared and arranged for a great movement.” Further explanation by Clausewitz lends to the idea that officials were alluding to this section of the book, “Now the real use which we derive from these reflections is the conclusion that every measure which is taken during a state of tension is more important and more prolific in results than the same measure could be in a state of equilibrium, and that this importance increases immensely in the highest degrees of tension.”[2] These effects are immensely important to the development of public policy, which makes a “strategy of tension” a highly effective way to manipulate such policy.

Italy

The term strategy of tension recurred during the trials that followed in the 1970s and 1980s Years of Lead (“anni di piombo”), during which terror attacks and assassinations were committed by apparently neofascist terrorists allegedly related to Operation Gladio.

It was primarily members and international supporters of the Italian Communist Party who invented and popularized the term “strategy of tension”. They meant to draw attention to the crimes of the Italian right and far-right parties who were allegedly supported by the foreign belligerents.

A 1995 report from the Left Democrats (the rebranded Communist Party of Italy, PCI) to a subcommittee of the Italian Parliament first stated that a “strategy of tension” was followed by Gladio and had been supported by the United States to “stop the PCI, and to a certain degree also the PSI, from reaching executive power in the country”. Members of the Democratic Party of the Left (PDS), part of the Commission on Terrorism headed by senator Giovanni Pellegrino and created in 1988, also described the Italian peninsula since the end of World War II as a “country with ‘limited sovereignty'” and as an “American colony”. The centrist Italian Republican party described the claims as worthy of a 1970s Maoist group. Aldo Giannuli, a historian who works as a consultant to the parliamentary terrorism commission, sees the release of the Left Democrats’ report as a manoeuvre dictated primarily by domestic political considerations. “Since they have been in power the Left Democrats have given us very little help in gaining access to security service archives,” he said. “This is a falsely courageous report.”

General Gianadelio Maletti, commander of the counter-intelligence section of the Italian military intelligence service from 1971 to 1975, stated that his men in the region of Venice discovered a rightwing terrorist cell that was supplied military explosives from Germany, and he alleged that US intelligence services instigated and abetted rightwing terrorism in Italy during the 1970s.

FROM WIKIPEDIA

10 Qualities of a Great “Strategist”

Strategic thinking skills can set you apart!!

I recently gave a keynote presentation on the topic of “strategy” to an audience of several hundred MBA students. I decided to focus my discussion on what I see as the growing challenge of recruiting elusive “cross-over” talent … meaning individuals that have equal parts deep technical expertise coupled with big picture strategic thinking skills. My plea to the students was simple …

Regardless of your field of interest … develop and refine your “strategist” skills now … it will pay off big …

I shared this list of qualities I have compiled over time based on my own experience and inputs from other strategists I greatly admire. By no means complete … but a solid place to start!

10 Qualities of a Great “Strategist” :

⦁ A strong grasp of core strategic principles and frameworks

⦁ A fast processor of (often messy) information

⦁ An expert in simplifying complexity

⦁ Comfortable with imperfect information

⦁ Nimble and pragmatic by nature

⦁ An objective, independent thinker

⦁ Skilled at the power of harnessing team collaboration and ideas

⦁ An effective influencer and change agent

⦁ A confident communicator and exceptional story teller

⦁ Always (always!) focused on actionable decisions and impact

” There is nothing impossible to him who will try. “

from: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/10-qualities-great-strategist-paul-logue

 

How can I think like Light Yagami?

This is how I did it:

1. Get on his mental level by exercising the brain daily. (Board games, remembering information to make the brain get use to it etc.)

2. Sleep 8 hours with enough water intake and a healthy meal.

3. Exercise daily (physically) and always have a goal to get better at what you’re doing. If you fail, try it again and again and keep raising the bar.

4. Befriend smart people. Spending time with smarter people will make you think more overall. (Remember the more you use the brain like a muscle the better)

5. The previous night, plan your goals for the next day and how you you will achieve them. That night you examine your mistakes and what worked. Do the same for the next day and keep improving.

6. Find happiness in your progress to your goals rather than finding it in love, friendship or alcohol and bad habits.

7. Be mature. Light himself would not google how to be like someone else, so be you and create your own ideal world.

8. Be confident and happy with yourself. Find your way to make people side with you. It may be your confidence, appearance, eyes or tone. People will see you how you see yourself.

” I’ve got a winner mentality, the mentality of a champion “

 

Death Note: How can one learn to think like L?

Anderson Moorer hit the nail on the head; L is purely fictional. Like Sherlock Holmes, James Bond, Mcguyver, Batman, and Iron Man, despite being a supposedly “normal” human being, the character L has been blessed with superhuman resources both external and internal. He has infinite wealth and endless willpower. Most humans have neither of these things and that probably includes you.

That being said…
It’s definitely possible to be like L.
Practical? No.
Easy? Hell no.
Fun? Not always.
Possible? Definitely.

The thing that makes characters like L so greatly fascinating is that not only are their abilities amazing, but fundamentally obtainable; in theory, at least. With enough discipline, you can gain intelligence, and with enough intelligence you can gain resources, and with enough resources you can do anything. If you can discipline yourself for some daily research (yes daily; like I said, its not easy) and understand what it is that L is so good at that makes him awesome, you could eventually become a genius like L. Your biggest obstacle is, of course, just how many things L is good at. Not just good enough, either, but a master; Mastery takes time and effort, and you’ll be studying out the wazoo to obtain anything close to his intelligence. I wouldn’t even recommend prioritizing being equal; L is an ideal, not a realistic goal. Great thing about ideals, though, is that while we can never make it, trying brings us close enough to succeed at something great.

I’ve actually studied Death Note and am trying to increase my intelligence in similar manner. The sources below are a part of my past, present, and future research, and if you really want to emulate L’s brilliance, I suggest looking it over and seeing what you can do.

Sources:

The Art of Learning: written by real genius Josh Waitzkin, who was the inspiration for “Finding Bobby Fischer”.
The Art of Strategy: self-explanatory title written by economic game theorist about game theory and thinking one step ahead of competition.
The Signal and the Noise: discusses how to make predictions based on logic and probability.
http://www.khanacademy.com: website where you can learn academic subjects for free. Pay special emphasis on statistics, probability, and Bayes theorem.
Mastermind: How to think like Shelock Holmes. Also self explanatory.

Dual N-back: an electronic game you can play on any device that is scientifically proven to improve short-term memory.

Also be sure to look for your own source material and practice, practice, PRACTICE.
Or don’t; it’s important to note that L dies in the end, so put this all in perspective.

” a winner never whines “

From : https://www.quora.com/Death-Note-How-can-one-learn-to-think-like-L